Voici ce qui nous attend en ce mois de rentrée en matière d’événements sur #managementdeprojet, #Agile et #Leadership

J’ai dénombré plus d’un événement par jour sur le management de projets en ce mois de septembre.

De quoi se tenir à jour, s’instruire et gagner des PDUs pour les certifiés du PMI® et points CDP pour les PRINCE2® Practitioner. Et il y a également de nombreux wébinaires sur l’Agilité.

Si vous participez à l’une ou plusieurs de ces sessions, merci de partager vos commentaires sur celle-ci. Ce que vous en avez retenu, son intérêt, la qualité de l’intervenant.e … Ainsi, je pourrais affiner ma sélection pour les prochains mois. De même, si vous connaissez d’autres événements que je n’ai pas indiqués, donnez-moi les références 🙂

QRP International est partenaire de DantotsuPM

Mercredi 4 – Webinar – PMI® – Time to Reinvent Project Management

L’intelligence artificielle, la robotique, la blockchain… Nombreuses sont les ruptures technologiques potentielles.

This webinar will explore the challenges that the project management profession is facing both from a methodological point of view, as well as the disruptions that are already impacting us, such as AI, robots and block chain.

Jeudi 5 – Montréal – PMI® Montréal – De gestionnaire de projets à producteur exécutif !

Vous êtes passionné par le cinéma, la télévision, les spectacles, le théâtre, la musique, les grands événements, les festivals ou encore les jeux vidéo? Venez découvrir comment vous pouvez mettre à profit vos compétences en gestion de projets dans le secteur des industries créatives et ainsi fusionner vos deux passions.

Jeudi 5 – Zürich – PMI® Switzerland – Innovation in project management, apply inspiration !

Celebrating PMI’s 50th anniversary, the Switzerland Chapter is organizing this conference addressing experienced professionals who have “seen it all, done it all”, and still want to learn more, expand their skillset, mindset, and toolset. We have invited expert speakers who share their innovative experiences in project management. No science-fiction, all practical inspiration for participants to apply in their own projects and organizations. And, there’s even more! Participants will not only gain practical inspiration from the speakers, but also from their peers. We invite you to take part in the “SIX Networking Challenge”, sharing ideas with your peers while networking!

Jeudi 5 – Webinar – Scrum.Org – Improving Flow in Scrum Teams

Question the expert, Yuval Yeret about using Kanban with Scrum practices, metrics, how it affects core Scrum elements as well as complementary practices such as Burndown Charts, Story Points and tasks, and more.

CertYou est partenaire de DantotsuPM

Jeudi 5 – Webinar – PMI® – The Impact of Robot Process Automation to Agile

Robot Process Automation (RPA) is one of the recent practices that is usually combined with Agile adoption as part of Digital Transformations. Sometimes implemented as the ‘old’ workflows, RPA can easily become the famous GIGO (Garbage In – Garbage Out), speeding-up unnecessary processes rather than providing value for the business. This webinar analyzes the benefits of RPA, combined with Agile adoption, using a parallel with the introduction of robotization in manufacturing. It is also an analysis of how/if RPA and Artificial Intelligence can be used in Project Management to improve the project delivery process.

Vendredi 6 – Webinar – PMI® UK – How to Become CEO of your Program

Livre sur Amazon

You may be in your organization’s C-Suite currently, or you may have upward mobility to be in the future. Regardless of where you are today, you are already empowered to be the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) for your Program (and/or Project). Join bestselling author Ms. Irene Didinsky « Author of the PMI endorsed 2017 released ‘Practioner’s Guide to Program Management’ as she walks us through her ideology and framework for Program Management and how to mirror the impact, accountability and investment in your Program that a CEO has in their company.


Dimanche 8 à Mardi 10 – Dar es Salaam TanzaniaPMI Africa 2019

This is the 4th PMI Africa Conference, the 1st was held in Johannesburg, South Africa in 2015, the 2nd in Accra, Ghana in 2016, and the 3rd in Port Louis, Mauritius. Each of the conferences attracted over 300 delegates from around the world including –business leaders, entrepreneurs, professors, politicians, humanitarians and industry experts.

Mardi 10 – Luxembourg – Agile² – Design Agile Organization

The context of work has changed. Prof. Dr Peter Kruse highlight three main consequences of the « Tsunami » of globalization and networking:

  1. Exponentially growing Complexity changing the rules of the Economy and leadership in impact.
  2. The tremendous growth of democratization: the power has shifted from offer to demand.
  3. Dissolution of structural boundaries: core melting.

Mardi 10 – Basel – PMI® Switzerland – Listening to Lead with 4 experiments

Opportunities emerge in every interaction – If we listen carefully. It requires leading conversations more consciously and developing a more flexible, connected and refreshing way of supporting teams and individuals through change. The workshop consists of 4 practical interactive experiments that will enable you to listen and lead with more intention and care in your projects and everyday life.

Mercredi 11 – Webinar – PMI® – Change Management is a Product, used by your employees

de bons outilsWhy, as a project leader, should you be personally invested in organizational change for your project efforts? Learn why change is so vital to your project success as well as how to action 3 critical change moments that matter toward project success. Walk away with practical learning that can immediately be applied to enhance your project leader’s toolkit!

Mercredi 11 – Webinar – Incrementor – 3 Roles but 1 Team

I am sure you have heard the saying “There is no ‘i’ in Team” before. For an effective Scrum team that statement makes perfect sense. On the flip-side, Scrum defines 3 distinct roles with very specific responsibilities and accountabilities. When roles are defined this way, there is a risk that gaps and gray areas emerge.

Jeudi 12 – Montréal – PMI® Montréal – L’Art de Convaincre

L’Art de Convaincre en entreprise vous apprend:

  1.  À créer une introduction efficace à votre message
  2.  À concevoir un message clair et concis
  3.  À avoir une communication verbale convaincante
CSP est partenaire de DantotsuPM

Jeudi 12 – Lille – PMI® France – Présentation du programme mentorat 

Vous êtes intéressés par le mentorat et vous ne savez pas par où commencer. Le PMI vous offre d’explorer cet outil puissant de développement personnel et professionnel et de l’appliquer à la gestion de projet. Suite à cette rencontre, si un nombre suffisant de participants se manifestent le PMI France Lille proposera un premier groupe de mentorat à ses membres.

Partenaire de DantotsuPM

Jeudi 12 – Mulhouse – PMI® France – Quels outils pour une communication efficace dans une équipe projet?

La communication représente près de 80% du travail d’un chef de projets. La maîtrise efficace des techniques adaptées aux différents contextes est un élément essentiel du leadership permettant l’atteinte des objectifs du projet mais aussi des objectifs personnels des membres de l’équipe. Venez échanger avec nous sur les bonnes pratiques utilisées dans différents types d’entreprises et d’activités. Vous pourrez également présenter vos propres outils et les confronter aux retours d’expériences des autres participants.

Jeudi 12 – Lausanne – PMI® Switzerland – A journey into innovation: how to navigate through the R&D environment

How can a company adapt its project management style and structure to the specific R&D environment, via the example of Nestlé Research? During this presentation the constraints linked to scientific research will be explored as well as the methods used to mitigate them. From linear project management to end-to-end project management, Nestlé has developed specific processes to adapt the project management style to the desired outcome. Scope change, risks, time and stakeholder management will be outlined over concrete examples. And because project management is not limited to big industries, hints will also be provided of how it can be used in young companies to accelerate success.

Jeudi 12 – Webinar – PMI® Organizational Agility Conference 2019 (6 PDUs)

For its 5th edition, the PMI® Organizational Agility Conference proposes to examine « Evolving Approaches to Resilient Value Delivery! »

Older concepts of change management proposed that organizations freeze in their current state, transform and then come out into a new state of being. Organizations no longer have the luxury to stand still while they change as the next change is not so far away…

Jeudi 12 – Webinar – Axelos – The Power of Professional Certification Report Highlights

Is certification still a valuable indicator of knowledge? Do organizations and individuals still think that passing an exam is a sign that the individual can do a job? Is certification still a significant waymark on the path to learning? What is the global demand for certifications,  including ITIL® and PRINCE2®? 

QRP International est partenaire de DantotsuPM

Jeudi 12 – Webinar – APMG – How to plan an Agile Change Initiative with Melanie Franklin

A step-by-step approach for creating a high-level plan and the techniques needed to develop specific plans for each element of your change.

Vendredi 13 – Montréal – PMI® Montréal – Venez célébrer le 50e anniversaire du PMI ! 

En tant que PDG du Project Management Institute (PMI) Sunil Prashara a la responsabilité de déployer la stratégie globale du PMI en priorisant les membres et l’agilité organisationnelle. Le but est d’améliorer et de promouvoir la profession de gestionnaire de projet. Jetez un coup d’œil au « CEO Corner » pour rester au fait de ses publications.

Vendredi 13 & Samedi 14 – Moulin Vieux – Conférence Agile Games Alpes

Agile Games Alpes 2019 est un Open Space sur 1,5 jours dédié aux Jeux Agiles et dérivés. Cette manifestation s’adresse aux personnes souhaitant :

  • Etre inspirés et inspirer
  • Tester de nouvelles techniques
  • Concevoir des jeux
  • Partager entre praticiens joueurs
  • Utiliser des jeux de coaching
  • Etre surpris
  • Rencontrer des concepteurs de jeux

Cette manifestation est ouverte à tous, sans exception, pour peu que chacun souhaite y être majoritairement contributeur plutôt que consommateur 🙂


Lundi 16 et Mardi 17 – Paris – Agile en Seine

Agile en Seine privilégie chaque année depuis 3 ans maintenant les retours d’expérience de sociétés dans leurs pratiques de l’Agilité. Et c’est en voyant toutes ces propositions que l’on remarque la tendance à l’industrialisation de cette mise en place, mais aussi une très grande diversité dans les manières de faire. Il est loin le temps où l’Agile était confiné uniquement à l’IT. Ce mouvement va bien au-delà aujourd’hui.

C’est d’ailleurs la thématique de cette année : L’Agile est majeur, il fête ses 18 ans.

Mardi 17 – Paris – PMI® France – Engager votre équipe dans l’excellence décisionnelle

Mise en œuvre avec succès depuis plus de dix ans dans de grands groupes, l’excellence décisionnelle est une approche puissante pour gérer les risques décisionnels dans un environnement complexe et incertain : De nombreuses parties prenantes et expertises à mettre en synergie dans des délais toujours plus courts.

Mardi 17 – Montréal – PMI® Montréal – Delivering is not enough

Becoming Skilled in Organizational Change and Transformation. Our project deliverables must enable business outcomes, and business outcomes can only be realized with organizational change. This interactive session will examine basic organizational change management theory and provide project managers with a basic toolkit that will enable participants to move from delivering deliverables to changing and transforming organizations.

Mardi 17 – Webinar – PMI® – Change for Project Leaders: Making the Case

Participants will learn why change is so vital to their project success as well as how to action 3 critical change moments that matter toward project success. Participants walk away with practical learning that can immediately be applied to enhance any project leader’s toolkit!

Mardi 17 – Lausanne – SMP – 7 clés de la négociation validées par la science

La Négociation Intégrale est le résultat de 20 ans d’expérience et 5 ans de recherches dans le domaine de la négociation et de la gestion des conflits.

Au cours de cette soirée, animée par Stéphane Royer, vous pourrez découvrir son efficacité en 3 étapes :

  1. Elle reprend les invariants des méthodes les plus connues. En d’autres termes, elle dégage l’ensemble des définitions, principes, processus, règles, attitudes et stratégies des méthodes les plus répandues
  2. Elle arbitre les différences entre ces méthodes par les dernières études scientifiques
  3. Elle corrobore ces résultats avec l’expérience des praticiens-managers de la négociation.

Mercredi 18 – Webinar – PMI® – Do You Have Access to Unlimited Resources?

PMGS est partenaire de DantotsuPM

Of course NOT!

What world do YOU live in?

In this world, there are only so many hours in a day.

We cannot travel through time and we cannot clone our resources.

Accepting these realities is a key to successful project management and the ticket to ensuring your team still wants to work with you after your current project.

All work needs to be accurately modeled for project and non-project work (operations), in current and new projects.

All work needs to be aggregated across all projects and operations.

Over-allocations need to be avoided or resolved.

Mercredi 18 – Luxembourg – PMI® Luxembourg – How Agile are Companies in Luxembourg (and other European countries)

Following the success in 2017, PMI Luxembourg Chapter and PwC Luxembourg have the pleasure to invite you to the closing event of this year’s research project on Agile Transformations in Luxembourg.

Mercredi 18 – Webinar – APMG – The Naked Agilist: Laying bare the truth about Agile Transformation

Agile transformations are increasingly becoming the norm, but is it all about changing to sprints, daily stand-ups, and Kanban boards? This webinar will discuss what an agile transformation is and is not. Your presenter, Dr Ian Clarkson, will lay bare what an agile transformation is all about. Is it just like any other transformation or something special?

Jeudi 19 – Lyon – PMI® France – Les projets en question, regard philosophique

Managers de projets, vous avez souvent été confrontés à des problématiques que seuls vous ne parveniez pas à gérer, la force du collectif, les méthodes du codéveloppement vous ont été souvent utiles pour aborder autrement le problème et avoir un autre éclairage. Notre conférence donnera la parole à des chefs de projets qui ont testé les méthodes du codéveloppement, du questionnement et qui ont accepté de partager leurs expériences avec vous. Ces expériences prendront encore une autre dimension avec un éclairage philosophique donné par Flora BERNARD, qui intervient auprès d’organisations sur les thèmes de la philosophie d’entreprise.

Jeudi 19 – Brussels – PMI® Belgium – An exclusive event hosted at Brussels Airport by Brussels Airport Company (BAC)

The operating context for airports is changing rapidly.  The old model of just assuring the flight movements and the safety of the passengers is no longer enough to compete in today’s aviation world.  New business lines must be developed and scaled and run efficiently.  The concept of “customer of the airport” is evolving and the expectations of the customer are best described as liquid.  BAC has chosen for a transformation to gear up for the decades to come. To support such a transformation, the concept of the PMO has evolve too.  The evolution of the BAC PMO is this evening’s topic.

Jeudi 19 – Webinar – PMI® – Powering Your Career with PMI

Are you looking for a new job in the project management profession? Our premier job board is your career headquarters. In this webinar you will learn about the PMI Career Center, and how to access free job tools available to you. The PMI Job Board is a free tool for project professionals to explore relevant opportunities and to stand apart to top companies in the world of project management. Explore the PMI Job Board to Power Your Career !

Jeudi 19 – Webinar – Digité – From Teams to Portfolio, the Importance of Upstream Kanban

More about Kanban

In this webinar we will talk about the importance of Upstream Kanban to connect the work from teams to portfolio level, helping people to think about systemic improvements and considering value delivery from clients needs to their satisfaction. Upstream process understanding can improve demand versus capacity balance, with prioritization based on indicators as cost of delay before teams have to commit to work, which can improve business expectations management, negotiation and team morale.

Vendredi 20 – Webinar – Agile Alliance – Agile Coaching Network

Do you need help with your Agile adoption? Or would you like to share what worked or didn’t for you? If so, we invite you to participate in the Agile Coaching Network. It’s entirely free and safe.

Vendredi 20 – Sophia Antipolis – agile tour 2019

Conférences plénières, ateliers, facilitation graphique, jeux, échanges et networking, autour des thématiques :

  • Agile 2.0
  • Agilité, mais encore?
  • Bien être au travail
  • Agile à l’échelle
  • Innovation / Craftmanship
Retrouvez le meilleur de l’agilité sur une journée !

Vendredi 20 – Tunis – PMI® Tunisia – Project Governance Implementation Methodology by COBIT in French language (1 PDU)

Speaker: Mr Walid Bouzouita
– Consultant and CISA, COBIT5 Implementation, ITIL, ISO31000 Trainer
– Certified trainer COBIT5
– ISACA Tunisia Chapter Executive Director and Chapter Past President

Vendredi 20 – Webinar – PMI® – A Look at the Role of PMI and ISO Standards in Agile

Most Agile frameworks developed for small software teams (relative to the size of an organisation) believe that adopting Agile is a Risk Mitigation approach and/or that in Agile risk is reduced compared with the traditional planned approach, wrongly limited to « waterfall » software development. Apart from the fact that there is no empirical or scientific evidence of that, most Agile practitioners can’t or won’t look at the dual aspect of risk (positive and negative), missing one of the significant benefits of Agile – opportunities management, or in other words, positive risks. Considering Risk Management from the Agile perspective, this webinar is a review of how Risk Management practices and standards can be scaled down and adopted by Agile Teams.

Vendredi 20 et Samedi 21 – ESTIA à Bidart – Agile Pays Basque

2 jours de conférences et ateliers Agile, sur le développement logiciel, la culture produit et les transformations organisationnelles.


Lundi 23 – Québec – PMI® section de Lévis-Québec – Indicateurs de performance: Retourner à la base pour éviter la démesure, tout un ART !

Développer des indicateurs de performance pour suivre les enjeux humains dans le cadre de la gestion de projet, c’est possible et souhaitable. Il suffit de rester simples et connectés ! La présentation intègre deux notions importantes : l’amélioration continue et les indicateurs clés de performance. La roue de l’amélioration continue, la roue de Demming, n’a pas besoin d’être réinventée. Chaque quartier de la roue constitue une étape clé du processus. Nous nous intéresserons particulièrement à la 3e étape, celle de la validation/vérification, et des indicateurs de performance qui peuvent être utilisés relativement aux facteurs clés de succès des projets.

Mardi 24 – Webinar – PMI® France Région Globale – Comment réseauter efficacement ?

Nous revendiquons toutes et tous « un réseau », une activité de networking… mais quelle est leur efficacité ? Organisation, consommation de temps et d’énergie, génération de réelles interactions et rencontres, maîtrise de son e-réputation sont autant de questions à se poser. Alors, quelle démarche adopter ?

Mardi 24 – Webinar – PMI® – How Digitalization Affects Project Management

Digital transformation is a phenomenon occurring across sectors and nations, affecting not only technical processes, but also organizational forms and managerial practices. Project management, which is often used as an agent for change, plays a significant role in initiating and implementing digital transformation. Comparative case studies in the context of commercial construction have been conducted in Sweden and in Germany. Special attention has been paid to the role of digital solutions such as Building Information Modeling (BIM) and Virtual Design and Construction (VDC) for organizing projects. While there seems to be a shared understanding of the potential of the technology to disrupt and innovate the industry, the actual usage leads to progress but also faces barriers.

Mercredi 25 et Jeudi 26 – London – APMG International & Agile Business Consortium – Agile Business Conference 2019

The Agile Business Conference, organised and hosted by the Agile Business Consortium, is a major, two-day annual event which provides a single forum for everyone interested in the application of Agile or moving towards an Agile way of working. Now in its 17th year, the event is the world’s longest running Agile conference. 2019 will see the conference moving further into the realm of Business Agility as it joins partnership with the Business Agility Institute. The theme for the 2019 edition is « The Case for Business Agility ».

Jeudi 26 – Toulouse – PMI® France – Digital tools: from Collaboration to Co-creation

Géry Schneider

L’atelier, animé par Géry Schneider amènera les participants à repenser leur façon d’utiliser leurs outils collaboratifs pour augmenter l’aspect « co-création » (et pas seulement le partage d’informations). D’une part à travers la présentation de fonctions et d’outils, nous illustrerons les utilisation dans les équipes. D’autre part, par le partage d’expériences, nous amènerons les participants à s‘enrichir mutuellement sur l’utilisation de ces fonctions et de leurs propres outils.

Jeudi 26 – Webinar – Scrum.Org – Scrum Teams Are Self-Organizing. Get Over it.

Scrum is among a very small number of frameworks which acknowledge that self-organization is natural. Scrum asserts that the quality of decisions increase when stakeholders collaborate with and trust the wisdom of their teams. The opposite is also true: Scrum’s design implies that common misbehaviors of managers (intervention, command & control) have costly consequences. This webinar will help you learn strategies to better manage the work environment to support Scrum Teams and enable successful self-organization.

CertYou est partenaire de DantotsuPM

Jeudi 26 – Webinar – PMI® UK – The Presentation on Presentation

We aren’t born to be professional level presenters but through this entertaining presentation the ‘rights’ and ‘wrongs’ of good presentations are explored along with a ‘how to prepare’ for that all-important event. With a few simple lessons taught through the very medium of ‘presentation’ the audience will take away some great ideas for improving their own technique and ‘death by PowerPoint’ is definitely not the outcome.

Jeudi 26 – Luxembourg – PMI® – PM Mentoring ‘Campfire’ evening

Running a project can sometimes be a thankless task. It is not unusual to spend months feeling under assault from all sides! The purpose of the Luxembourg PM Mentoring ‘Campfire’ is to create a space and opportunity where PMs can come together to share and learn from each other’s project concerns and experiences. Participation is free and registration is open to PMI Chapter Members, however, given the anticipated nature of the discussions, attendance is limited to 12.

Vendredi 27 – Aubagne – PMI® France – Must Have Tools

PMI is a registered mark of Project Management Institute, Inc.


Lundi 30 Septembre au Mercredi 2 Octobre – Merida, Yucatan – Mexico – IPMA World Congress

“Integrating Sustainability into Project Management”

The event program will cover project trends and development on clean energy, infrastructure development, automotive and aerospace, agribusiness and rural development, smart cities, mining, tourism, and environment.This program is to be covered in three days, with eight conferences from international world-class keynote speakers, aimed to set the tone for the day.

Voilà, c’était tout pour ce très riche mois de septembre !

Si vous participez à l’une ou plusieurs de ces sessions, merci de partager vos commentaires sur celle-ci. Ce que vous en avez retenu, son intérêt, la qualité de l’intervenant.e …

Ainsi, je pourrais affiner ma sélection pour les prochains mois. De même, si vous connaissez d’autres événements que je n’ai pas indiqués, donnez-moi les références 🙂

Enquête sur les métriques dans le management de projet

Bonjour,

Dans le cadre de son mémoire, Djalal DEROUAZ, a élaboré un questionnaire afin d’analyser les liens perçus entre les indicateurs financiers et non financiers dans le management de projet. Il a besoin de récolter davantage de réponses et souhaite faire appel à nous 🙂

Comptez 8 à 10 minutes pour compléter ce questionnaire.

Michel.

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

August 11 – Webinar (PMI®) – A New Way to Connect Risks to Business Outcomes

PVaR: Project Value at Risk

Nicki Cons book on Amazon
Mrs Nicki Kons book on Amazon

PVaR (Project Value at Risk) is a new indicator for connecting risks to two of the most important questions in project management: when will the project be completed and at what cost? It is based on the widely accepted VaR (Value at Risk) financial indicator.

This interactive session, with questionnaires and polls, will introduce the amazing progress and mini revolutions currently taking place in risk management: the cognitive and big data revolutions. The multitude of KRI (Key Risk Indicators) has made it difficult for project managers to communicate risk outputs in a concise, clear way, that decision makers could easily understand and use.

The main focus of the session will be on introducing the PVaR (Project Value at Risk) indicator and to demonstrate how you can use it to improve your communication with stakeholders and decision makers.

Register on line for this PMI Members’ webinar

PMI® is a registered mark of Project Management Institute, Inc.

Enregistrer

Enregistrer

July 5 – Webinar (PMI®) – Measure Twice, Change Once

Practical Strategies for Change Management

The strategic Project Leader Jack FerraroA session with Jack Ferraro, author of the famous book The Strategic Project Leader: Mastering Service-Based Project Leadership.

Sound change management processes and behaviors link strategy and execution teams.

They enable portfolio managers, executive leadership, and program and project teams to increase their organization’s ability to react effectively to change.

Attendees will learn a comprehensive approach to making your organization more responsive to change with effective structuring, planning, and measuring of change management across portfolios, programs and projects. Practitioners will gain insight into leading and directing strategic programs using real artifacts and case studies while taking away practical, usable examples to ingrain organizational change management into portfolios, programs and everyday projects.

PMI® is a registered mark of Project Management Institute, Inc.

Registration

carefully select your metrics at the KPIs library

As you may have understood while following this blog, I am NOT a big fan of having too many KPIs!

Key Per·for·mance In·di·ca·tor   /kē  pərˈfôrməns ˈindiˌkātər/   (abbr.: KPI)

kpi library logoKPIs help to get insight in your business performance — « What gets measured, gets managed ». KPIs are also known as performance metrics, business indicators, and performance ratios.

However, I do recognize their value when they are selected with attention and tailored to a specific context. You may want to check this library of KPIs for all sorts of domains and processes.

It exposes many KPIs from the PMBOK® Guide in the Project Portfolio section:

  • measureEarned Value Management (11)
  • Program management (93)
  • Project management (64)
  • Project office (19)
  • Project portfolio ratios (14)
  • Project/Program (26)
  • Resource planning (5)

http://kpilibrary.com/

PMBOK® Guide is a registered mark of Project Management Institute, Inc.

au delà des chiffres, comment mettre en place un jeu de métriques qui apportent de la valeur au projet

Metrics in Project Management: More than Just Number

http://www.projectmanagers.net/profiles/blogs/metrics-in-project-management par Crystal Lee, PMP

La mise en place d’une métrique n’est pas le sujet le plus sexy du management de projet.

faire la somme des dépensesMais le succès du bureau de management de projet (PMO) dans lequel vous travaillez et votre réussite de chef de projet peuvent dépendre du fait d’avoir ou pas un programme de métriques en place. Dans une période économique difficile, il y a des opportunités encore plus surprenantes pour un PMO de prouver sa vraie valeur pour l’organisation. Les informations contenues dans cet article peuvent vous aider à créer votre programme de métriques et évaluer si vos métriques actuelles en font assez pour justifier votre existence.

Métriques dans le management de projet : Plus que des chiffres

Une métrique est, par définition, tout type de mesure utilisée pour mesurer un certain composant quantifiable de performance.

Un métrique peut être directement obtenu par l’observation, comme le nombre de jours de retard, ou le nombre de défauts logiciels trouvés; ou le métrique peut être dérivé de quantités directement observables, comme des défauts par mille lignes de code, ou un indice de performance de coût (« Code Performance Index : CPI »).

Quand elle est utilisée dans un système de contrôle pour évaluer le projet ou la santé de programme, une mesure est appelée un indicateur, ou un indicateur clé de performance (« Key Performance Index : KPI »).

Définition de ce qu’est le management de métrique

L’intérêt intense pour les métriques dans la communauté du management de projet a engendré un sous-domaine entier d’étude appelée le management de métrique.

catégories de métrique projet
La métrique de projet peut être catégorisée en trois catégories principales
Quelques exemples :
  1. Mesures de management de projet pures: exactitude des estimations
  2. Les indicateurs de succès de projet : satisfaction des parties prenantes)
  3. Les indicateurs de réussite business : retour sur investissements (Return On Investment : ROI).

Au niveau macro, le management de métrique signifie identifier et suivre les objectifs stratégiques.

C’est souvent réalisé par le PMO, s’il existe. Un praticien du management de projet, Anthony Politano (voir son blog), a même préconisé que les sociétés devraient avoir un Officier En chef de Performance (« Chief Performance Officer : CPO »), qui serait responsable de la collecte et l’analyse de métriques et de communiquer ces mesures au management pour la prise de décisions stratégiques.

En remettant la métrique au management, il est important de conserver le facteur de temps à l’esprit. Le vrai succès ou le vrai échec peuvent ne pas être apparents immédiatement et le résultat peut parfois se matérialiser bien longtemps après que le projet soit formellement clôturé. Par exemple, une nouvelle application peut s’avérer être un échec colossal six mois après être mise en production quand elle atteint enfin ses objectifs d’usage prévus.

métrique macroLes exemples de métrique de macro-niveau incluent : nombre de projets réussis, pourcentage de projets ratés et nombre d’heures passées par projet ou programme.

Au micro niveau, le management de métrique signifie identifier et suivre les objectifs tactiques.

C’est seulement en observant la métrique au niveau des tâches que le statut de livrables de niveau plus élevé peut être vérifié, et que l’on peut alors le communiquer aux parties prenantes et clients. Différents types de projets exigeront différents types de métriques : un projet de développement logiciel demande des mesures différentes de, disons, un projet de fusion et acquisition.

Les critères suivants sont les mesures tactiques les plus communes dont les gens aiment être informés :
métrique micro
zoom sur quelques métriques de niveau projet
  • Comment progressons-nous par rapport à l’échéancier ? Schedule Performance Index (SPI) = Earned Value ÷ Planned Value Cost (SPI)
  • Où en sommes-nous par rapport au budget ? Cost Performance Index (CPI) = Earned Value ÷ Actual Cost Resources
  • Sommes-nous dans les prévisions d’heures de travail dépensées ? Nombre d’heures supplémentaires.
  • Les changements de périmètre sont-ils été plus importants que prévu ? Nombre de demandes de changement.
  • Les problèmes de qualité sont-ils réparés ? Le nombre de défauts réparés par test de recette.
  • Sommes-nous à jour de notre liste d’actions ? Nombre de problèmes en attente de résolution.

Mise en place d’un Programme de Métriques

notes think
prenez du recul pour bien poser vos métriques

Une phrase commune que vous pouvez entendre sur les métriques est : “ce qui ne peut pas être mesuré, ne peut pas être managé”.

Clairement le manque de mesures peut rendre les choses plus difficiles pour un chef de projet.

En même temps, les mesures sont utiles seulement si elles sont précisément cela : utiles. Le suivi  des métriques seulement pour avoir quelque chose à mettre votre rapport d’avancement n’est pas une utilisation effective de votre temps, ou du temps de votre équipe.

Si vous voulez mettre en place un programme de métriques efficace, mettez du temps de côté pour planifier ces choses dans cet ordre:
  1. Quelles informations allez-vous rassembler ? (Astuce : Faites simple).
  2. Comment allez-vous collecter les informations ? (Astuce : Rendez-le facile. Utilisez des informations déjà produites pour d’autres objectifs.)
  3. Quelles méthodes utiliserez-vous pour traiter et analyser ces informations ? (Astuce : plus l’analyse mène à l’action meilleure elle est.)
  4. Comment et quand ferez-vous un rapport sur les résultats ?

Un mot spécial sur les rapports

La façon dont vous présentez votre métrique dépend de qui la demande.

Le cadre exécutif  veut d’habitude seulement connaître l’état général du projet et se sentir «rassuré», tandis que l’auditeur du PMO veut savoir que vous avez “deux jours de retard en raison du changement de portée approuvé, mais que vous remaniez l’échéancier pour les rattraper.”

Partenaire de DantotsuPM
Partenaire de DantotsuPM
La meilleure façon de présenter vos informations est d’habitude la plus simple.

Quelques progiciels de gestion de projet incluent une fonctionnalité de tableau de bord automatisée, qui peut ou pas pouvoir répondre à vos besoins. Des affichages visuels, comme un simple graphique pour illustrer des tendances, ou les classiques “ feux tricolores”, sont des façons efficaces de montrer le statut d’indicateurs majeurs de métrique.

Un graphique de type « feux de signalisation » simple peut être construit en Excel, utilisant des couleurs pour indiquer le statut. Typiquement :

  • traffic light orangeVert signifie “Jusqu’ici tout va bien”.
  • Orange “Attention – A surveiller”.
  • Rouge “une attention urgente est nécessaire”.

Votre rapport devrait montrer des indicateurs détaillés et un indicateur cumulatif pour comprendre le statut d’un simple coup d’œil.

En utilisant un format « feux de signalisation », assurez-vous de bien définir les règles sur quand changer de couleur sur les feux; travaillez avec le sponsor de projet ou le PMO pour le normaliser si ce n’est pas déjà fait. Vous pouvez avoir fait l’expérience d’essayer de vous décider sur quand exactement vous devriez tourner ce petit point à l’orange, ou ne pas être autorisé à le faire passer au rouge parce que votre manager ne veut pas que vous le fassiez.

Par exemple, pour un indicateur à base de calendrier, la règle peut être “faire passer l’indicateur à l’Orange quand le nombre de tâches en retard est supérieur à deux.”

Les indicateurs peuvent aussi être étalonnés sur des cibles mensuelles pour que les tendances globales puissent être visualisées. Il vaut mieux tourner le feu de signalisation à l’Orange quand le planning entier a cinq jours de retard lors du premier mois, que de ne le passer Orange que si vous atteignez 15 jours de retard au troisième mois, quand il est trop tard pour réagir.

Élevez le management de métrique au niveau supérieur

Comme vous continuez à accumuler les métriques des projets dans le portefeuille de projets de votre société, vous construisez une base de données de grande valeur en matière de benchmark interne. Comparez vos métriques à ceux d’autres projets dans votre portefeuille pour voir où des améliorations de processus peuvent être faites, ou bien si vous devriez introduire des exigences de conformité. Vous pouvez aussi comparer vos métriques aux données de benchmark de projets d’autres sociétés dans la même industrie.

Le management de projet en tant que discipline continue à croître et ne montre aucun signe de ralentissement. Comme Greg Balestrero l’avait dit lorsqu’il dirigeait le PMI: « plus de 87% d’organisations remontent déjà le statut de projet aux Conseils d’administration et 17% des rapports de PMOs aux PDGs »

Le défi est de s’assurer que le statut de projet inclut les métriques qui démontrent la valeur du management de projet.

ValueComme vous l’avez vu, il y a de nombreux outils et techniques disponibles pour communiquer et gérer la métrique à un niveau projet (tactique) ou PMO (stratégique).

Saisissez cette opportunité pour réfléchir à comment les personnes autour de vous perçoivent la valeur de vos services de management de projet et voyez si vous pouvez trouver des façons de promouvoir et protéger votre position comme un champion de management de projet dans votre organisation.

Agile is NOT just another fad !

« Agile is not just another fad » is one of the confirmation that the Arras Project Management Benchmark Report 2016 brings to our attention.

Arras 2016 BenchmarkBack for the 11th year, the Project Management Benchmark Report from Arras People is an independent survey into the lives and careers of PPM practitioners.

While Agile adoption is a key area of the report, other aspects such as the importance of recognized PPM accreditation, professional affiliations, career development, PMOs and even unemployment of some PMs are covered !

les métriques dans le management de projet : bien plus que des chiffres

Metrics in Project Management: More than Just Number

http://www.projectmanagers.net/profiles/blogs/metrics-in-project-management par Crystal Lee, PMP

métriques (over time)La métrique peut fort bien ne pas être le sujet le plus sexy dans le management de projet. Mais le succès du bureau de management de projet (PMO) dans lequel vous travaillez et votre réussite de chef de projet peuvent dépendre du fait d’avoir ou pas un programme de métriques en place. Dans une période économique difficile, il y a des opportunités encore plus surprenantes pour un PMO de prouver sa vraie valeur pour l’organisation. Les informations de cet article peuvent vous aider à créer votre programme de métriques ou d’évaluer si votre programme existant en fait assez pour justifier votre existence.

Métriques dans le management de projet : Plus que des chiffres

measureUne métrique, par définition, est tout type de mesure utilisée pour mesurer un certain composant quantifiable de performance. Un métrique peut être directement obtenu par l’observation, comme le nombre de jours de retard, ou le nombre de défauts logiciels trouvés; ou le métrique peut être dérivé de quantités directement observables, comme des défauts par mille lignes de code, ou un indice de performance de coût (« Code Performance Index : CPI »).

Quand utilisée dans un système de contrôle pour évaluer le projet ou la santé de programme, une mesure est appelée un indicateur, ou un indicateur clé de performance (« Key Performance Index : KPI »).

Définition du management de métrique

L’intérêt intense dans les métriques dans la communauté de management de projet a engendré un sous-domaine entier d’étude appelée le management de métrique. La métrique de projet peut être catégorisée en trois catégories principales :

  1. Mesures de management de projet pures (Exemple : exactitude des estimations)
  2. Les indicateurs de succès de projet (Exemple : satisfaction des parties prenantes)
  3. Les indicateurs de réussite business (Exemple : « Return On Investment : ROI »).

cpoAu niveau macro, le management de métrique signifie identifier et suivre les objectifs stratégiques. C’est souvent réalisé par le PMO, s’il existe. Un praticien de PM, Anthony Politano (voir son blog), a même préconisé que les sociétés devraient avoir un Officier En chef de Performance (« Chief Performance Officer : CPO »), qui serait responsable de la collecte et l’analyse de métriques et de communiquer ces mesures au management pour la prise de décisions stratégiques.

En donnant la métrique au management, il est important de conserver le facteur de temps à l’esprit. Le vrai succès ou le vrai échec peuvent ne pas être apparents jusqu’à bien longtemps après qu’un projet soit formellement clôturé. Par exemple, une nouvelle application peut s’avérer être un échec colossal six mois après être mise en production, quand elle atteint finalement ses objectifs d’utilisation prévus.

Les exemples de métrique de macro-niveau incluent : nombre de projets réussis, pourcentage de projets ratés et nombre d’heures passées par projet ou programme.

Au micro niveau, le management de métrique signifie identifier et suivre les objectifs tactiques. C’est seulement en observant la métrique au niveau des tâches que le statut de livrables de niveau plus haut peut être vérifié, et que l’on peut alors le communiquer aux parties prenantes et clients. Les types différents de projets exigeront différents types de métriques : un projet de développement logiciel demande des mesures différentes de, disons, un projet de fusion et acquisition.

Les critères suivants sont les mesures tactiques les plus communes dont les gens aiment être informés :

  • faire la somme des dépensesComment progressons-nous par rapport à l’échéancier ? Schedule Performance Index (SPI) = Earned Value ÷ Planned Value Cost (SPI)
  • Où en sommes-nous par rapport au budget ? Cost Performance Index (CPI) = Earned Value ÷ Actual Cost Resources
  • Sommes-nous dans les prévisions d’heures de travail dépensées ? Nombre d’heures supplémentaires.
  • Les changements de périmètre sont-ils été plus importants que prévu ? Nombre de demandes de changement.
  • Les problèmes de qualité sont-ils réparés ? Le nombre de défauts réparés par test de recette.
  • Sommes-nous à jour de notre liste d’actions ? Nombre de problèmes en attente de résolution.

Mise en place d’un Programme de Métriques

Une phrase commune que vous pouvez entendre sur les métriques est : “ce qui ne peut pas être mesuré, ne peut pas être managé”. Clairement le manque de mesures peut rendre les choses plus difficiles pour un chef de projet.

calculerEn même temps, les mesures sont utiles seulement si elles sont précisément cela : utiles. Le suivi  des métriques seulement pour avoir quelque chose à mettre votre rapport d’avancement n’est pas une utilisation effective de votre temps, ou du temps de votre équipe.

Si vous voulez mettre en place un programme de métriques efficace, mettez du temps de côté pour planifier ces choses dans cet ordre:

  • Quelles informations allez-vous rassembler ? (Astuce : Faites simple).
  • Comment allez-vous collecter les informations ? (Astuce : Rendez-le facile. Utilisez des informations déjà produites pour d’autres objectifs.)
  • Quelles méthodes utiliserez-vous pour traiter et analyser les informations ? (Astuce : plus l’analyse mène à l’action meilleure elle est.)
  • Comment et quand ferez-vous un rapport sur les résultats ?

Un mot spécial sur les rapports

Image courtesy of renjith krishnan / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of renjith krishnan / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

La façon dont vous présentez votre métrique dépend de qui la demande. Le cadre exécutif  veut d’habitude seulement connaître l’état général du projet et se sentir « confortable »”, tandis que l’auditeur du PMO veut savoir que vous avez “deux jours de retard en raison du changement de portée approuvé, mais que vous remaniez l’échéancier pour les rattraper.”

La meilleure façon de présenter vos informations est d’habitude la plus simple. Quelques progiciels de gestion de projet incluent une fonctionnalité de tableau de bord automatisée, qui peut ou pas pouvoir répondre à vos besoins. Des affichages visuels, comme un simple graphique pour illustrer des tendances, ou les classiques “ feux tricolores”, sont des façons efficaces de montrer le statut d’indicateurs majeurs de métrique. Un graphique de feu de signalisation simple peut être construit en Excel, utilisant des couleurs pour indiquer le statut. Typiquement :

  • Vert signifie “Jusqu’ici tout va bien”.
  • Orange “Attention – A surveiller”.
  • Rouge “une attention urgente est nécessaire”.

Votre rapport de feu de signalisation devrait montrer des indicateurs détaillés et un indicateur cumulatif pour comprendre le statut d’un simple coup d’œil.

stop siffletEn utilisant un format de feux de signalisation, assurez-vous de bien définir les règles sur quand changer de couleur sur les feux; travaillez avec le sponsor de projet ou le PMO pour le faire si ce n’est pas déjà normalisé. Vous pouvez avoir fait l’expérience d’essayer de vous décider sur quand exactement vous devriez tourner ce petit point à l’orange, ou ne pas être autoriser de le faire passer au rouge parce que votre manager ne veut pas que vous le fassiez.

Par exemple, pour un indicateur à base de calendrier, la règle peut être “faire passer l’indicateur à l’Orange quand le nombre de tâches en retard est supérieur à deux.” Les Indicateurs peuvent aussi être étalonnés sur des cibles mensuelles pour que les tendances globales puissent être visualisées. Il vaut mieux tourner le feu de signalisation à l’Orange quand le planning entier a cinq jours de retard lors du premier mois, que de ne le passer Orange que si vous atteignez 15 jours de retard au troisième mois, quand il est trop tard pour réagir.

Amenez le management de métrique au niveau supérieur

Comme vous continuez à accumuler les métriques des projets dans le portefeuille de projets de votre société, vous construisez une base de données de valeur en matière de benchmark interne. Comparez vos métriques à ceux d’autres projets dans votre portefeuille pour voir où des améliorations de processus peuvent être faites, ou bien où vous pourriez introduire des exigences de conformité. Vous pouvez aussi comparer vos métriques aux données de benchmark de projets d’autres sociétés dans la même industrie.

Une ressource pour les dernières nouveautés dans le management de métrique est le « Project Management Institute’s Metrics Special Interest Group (MetSIG) ». Le plus important événement MetSIG est son Congrès Mondial Online qui se tient chaque année en avril. Le Congrès est une série d’un mois de « webinars » en ligne sur des sujets concernant les métriques. Comme un témoignage de l’importance des métriques dans la communauté de management de projet, le MetSIG a évalué que presque 50,000 participants suivaient le Congrès MetSIG 2008 et que 50,000 de plus visionnent les présentations vidéo archivées (voir Www.metsig.org pour plus d’informations).

Le management de projet en tant que discipline continue à croître et ne montre aucun signe de ralentissement. Comme Greg Balestrero, le Président-Directeur Général de PMI l’avait cité dans son discours d’ouverture au Congrès MetSIG 2007, plus de 87% d’organisations remontent déjà le statut de projet aux Conseils d’administration et 17% des rapports de PMOs aux PDGs (KPMG, Global IT Project Management Survey, 2005).

Le défi est de s’assurer que le statut de projet inclut les métriques qui démontrent la valeur du management de projet.

Comme vous l’avez vu, il y a beaucoup d’outils et techniques disponibles pour communiquer et gérer la métrique à un niveau projet (tactique) ou PMO (stratégique). Saisissez cette occasion de penser à comment les personnes autour de vous perçoivent la valeur de vos services de management de projet et voyez si vous pouvez penser à des façons de promouvoir et protéger votre position comme un champion de management de projet dans votre organisation.

SMPP
Partenaire de DantotsuPM

Should you become a Chinese doctor towards your projects?

I often heard people say that that Chinese doctors are paid to keep their patients in good health rather than looking after them only when they become sick!

The project manager should also follow the vital signs of his project, anticipate potential issues and address them before the project gets seriously sick.

  • personnel hopitalDefine and implement concrete measurements
  • Identify and track the Critical path
  • Respect the schedule (variance of + or – 10 %)
  • Compare current efforts and results achieved to planned ones
  • Estimate costs incurred to planned expenditures
  • Verify the quality of the deliverables
  • Follow up on open problems (how many, how old, how long to resolve)
  • Run regular periodic reviews
  • Manage and control the risks
  • Boost the morale of the team and be sensitive of human aspects
  • Ensure that your sponsor participates and that your customers are involved and informed
  • Anticipate events via trend analysis of key indicators

Define and implement concrete measurements

Without objective measures, it is difficult to judge in a factual and effective way, even though I think that some subjective signs carry as much importance as facts. So, chooseyour metrics, set a baseline and then compare progress to this reference point. Measure such things as delays on planned milestones, number of requests of change, variations between projected costs and resources consumption (BCWP, ACWP, BCWS, ACWS for the PMI fellows). Count the number of open and unresolved problems, and record their processing time. In addition to risks’ prioritization, check the involvement of sponsors and customers, verify the regularity of the communications and the frequency of project meetings…

Méta Projets Management
Partenaire de DantotsuPM

Identify and track the Critical path

A key element of schedule management is the critical path, the logical chain of tasks which, if they are not completed in due time, will inevitably delay the completion of the project. Thus, a vital sign to be watched carefully by the project manager.

Respect the schedule (any variance of + or – 10 %)

In fact, any significant variance must be analyzed to understand the reasons for the difference, envisage corrective or palliative actions and learn from these to prevent a recurrence of these problems during other parts or phases of the project.

Compare current efforts and results achieved to planned ones

I noticed that it is rather common to be under staffed at the start of the project. It often takes time to identify and recruit the best people as they are rarely unoccupied and just waiting for an assignment. The expenditures during this period may therefore be significantly lower than planned. However, it does not necessarily implies a delay in the progress of the project. As a matter of facts, I saw many under staffed team fully compensate the vacancies through better coordination and greater mobilization of team members. It is required to always put in perspective the work realized with the resources used. On the opposite side, any threat of delay in deliverables or reaching milestones of the project is usually a sign of strong fever and needs to be dealt with as a matter of urgency.

Partenaire de DantotsuPM
Partenaire de DantotsuPM

Estimate costs incurred to planned expenditures

Image courtesy of cooldesign / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of cooldesign / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Any significant overspend will obviously receive a good level of attention. But you should not forget to worry about situations of « under spending ». This weaker signal can prove to be critical later on in the project. It is often an indicator of delays to come: slow start, late deliveries of materials or software not critical today but necessary for the project on future tasks … It may also result from “simple” costs allocation errors that will catch up on you at a later time. And, it could also be played to your disadvantage by your financial colleagues during the biannual or quarterly budget reforecast exercise. Indeed, they often use as a basis of forecast the prior period spend and could propose a much lower estimate that what you know remains to be done and spent. Hence the importance for the project manager to master precisely the amount of the committed expenses versus invoices received.

Verify the quality of the deliverables

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

My experience is that quality is in most situations more important to customer satisfaction than time and cost, even if these are necessary. Without quality deliverables, there is no sustained customer satisfaction. So, any decline of the quality produced compared to specifications is to be reviewed in details to understand root causes and eradicate them. It is not sufficient to deliver in time and at cost a product that does not fully satisfy the customer, even if it apparently addresses the expressed needs. The prime focus of the entire team has to be customer satisfaction as this will bring success in the long run and lead to a stream of future fruitful projects. Satisfaction comes with the quality of the deliverables and the relationships built between the customer and the project team.

Follow up on open problems (how many, how old, how long to resolve)

No project comes free of problems, thus no reason to panic. It is particularly advisable to watch the backlog of unresolved and open problems and its evolution over time. If this backlog increases, it is a real concern. Additionally, the aging of known problems and their time to be resolved are also key indicators. Do not limit your analysis to averages (average age, average response time). As said by one of my directors, « a person not knowing how to swim can very well drown himself crossing a river which is on average 20 centimeters deep ! « . Therefore, let us try as hard as we can to understand the amplitude of variability of these indicators (possibly according to the criticality of the problems: « Show Stoppers », important, average, minor), with regard to acceptable min-max to be defined for your project. For example, any important problem should be addressed within 10 day; or, we shall have no more than 10 problems of average criticality outstanding during more than 3 weeks. Set up alarms for bells to ring when such targets are reached.

Run regular periodic reviews

Do not let the elapsed time between two project reviews stretch out to the point where you have to « jump » a scheduled session in the calendar. If the strategic checkpoints cannot take place, it could indicate an excessive workload, or delays which are starting to accumulate, or indifference of some stakeholders, or poor communications, or uninteresting agendas, or excessively long meetings… All are reasons to get on your feet and take actions.

Genius Inside est partenaire de DantotsuPM
Genius Inside est partenaire de DantotsuPM

Manage and control the risks

No excuse is acceptable to justify not revisiting the risk register very regularly to update it, to enrich it, and if necessary to activate mitigation plans. The conditions and the environment of the project do change and the risks evolve with them: new ones appear; existing ones should be retired or updated… Furthermore, the risks are often interconnected and evolve together. This is prone to create a snowball effect if we are not careful. For example, an increase of the probability of occurrence of several risks from low to medium is indicative of danger. Thus, never let the risk register take the dust on a shelf.

Boost the morale of the team and be sensitive of human aspects

Repeated late arrivals in the morning, early departures, absenteeism or on the contrary systematic overtime are some of the observable signs of problems. They often come along with a tense climate, with quarrels, with more escalations requiring your arbitration, nasty emails, the shrugs of shoulders … So many demonstrations of an illness to be taken into account to correct the situation as fast as possible.

Ensure that your sponsor participates and that your customers are involved and informed

If your sponsors seem to be less and less interested in your project: danger!

The causes may seem relatively minor: another current project in crisis, some operational emergencies, a big contract in preparation… But other causes exist that could strongly impact the project: a new project of greater priority, an upcoming reorganization, some shareholder’s change, weak or moving directions from management… You’ll be better off spending a little time investigating the situation.

If the customers appear to be more distant, less involved or dissatisfied, this is a red alert. Immediate actions are probably necessary to seek their opinion, listen to them, understand their issues and propose necessary changes.

Anticipate events via trend analysis of key indicators

Image courtesy of winnond / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of winnond / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The evolutions of indicators are often (always?) more important than their absolute values. Why is this indicator on a dangerous slope? Why is this other one erratic, unpredictable or weak? It is somewhat similar to monitoring the evolution of the vital signs of patients at hospitals, such as fever, pulse, red and blank corpuscles…

These are some of the thoughts around the vital signs of our projects which I wanted to share with you. Watch them with the greatest possible attention, as would do the Chinese doctor who has to keep his clients in good health if he ever wants to get paid!

I certainly missed some aspects which are important to you, so, do not hesitate to indicate these in your comments to this post and share your experiences.

« Dr » Michel.

 

chefs de projets : devriez-vous être le médecin chinois de vos projets ?

J’ai souvent entendu dire que le médecin chinois est rémunéré pour garder ses clients en bonne santé plutôt que les soigner lorsqu’ils sont malades.

Cette bonne approche devrait-elle s’appliquer au chef de projet qui suivrait les signes vitaux de son projet afin de les adresser avant que le projet ne soit sérieusement malade.

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Voici quelques-uns de ces signes vitaux et actions à entreprendre pour prévenir les problèmes de santé de votre projet :

  • Définissez et implémentez des mécanismes de mesures concrets
  • Établissez le Chemin Critique
  • Respectez le planning (variance de + ou -10%)
  • Comparez efforts actuels et résultats atteints au prévisionnel ou référence de base
  • Comparez les coûts prévisionnels aux dépenses avérées
  • Examinez la qualité des livrables
  • Suivez les problèmes ouverts (nombre, temps de résolution, âge)
  • Effectuez des revues régulières
  • Gérez et maîtrisez les risques
  • Managez le moral de l’équipe et les aspects humains
  • Assurez-vous de la participation du sponsor et de l’implication et de la satisfaction du client
  • Anticipez par l’analyse des tendances des indicateurs mis en place

Définissez et implémentez des mécanismes de mesures concrets

 

Image courtesy of winnond / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of winnond / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Sans mesures, il est difficile de juger de manière factuelle et objective, même si je pense que certains signes subjectifs sont tout aussi importants que les faits. D’où les mesures importantes connues des chefs de projet pour établir une référence et juger ensuite de l’avancement par rapport à celle-ci. On mesurera donc les délais par rapport aux jalons prévus, les demandes de changement, les variations par rapport aux coûts prévisionnels et au niveau de ressources utilisées (BCWP, ACWP, BCWS, ACWS… pour les familiers de PMI). On comptera également le nombre de problèmes ouverts, non résolus, et comptabilisera leur temps de traitement. De même que les niveaux de risque, l’implication des sponsors et des clients, la régularité des communications et réunions de projet…

Établissez le Chemin Critique

chemin critiqueÉlément clé du planning, le chemin critique, est l’enchainement logique de tâches qui, si elles n’étaient pas complétées dans les délais prévus, viendraient immanquablement retarder l’achèvement du projet. Donc, un signe de bonne marche du projet à surveiller par le chef de projet.

Valeurs normales – Respectez le planning (variance de + ou -10%)

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

En pratique, toute déviation significative doit être analysée pour comprendre les raisons profondes du décalage. Puis, il faut envisager des actions correctives ou palliatives, les appliquer et observer les résultats. Enfin, apprenez à en tirer les leçons pour prévenir une répétition de ces problèmes sur d’autres parties et phases du projet. Le petit truc en plus : écrivez noir sur blanc le pourcentage de variance en deçà duquel votre sponsor vous autorise à manager la situation sans lever de drapeau orange ou rouge.

Comparez efforts actuels et résultats atteints au prévisionnel ou référence de base

J’ai pu constater qu’il est assez fréquent de démarrer le projet en situation de sous effectifs. Le fait est qu’identifier et recruter les bonnes personnes qui sont souvent assignées à d’autres tâches ou projets peut demander plus de temps que prévu. Le réel dépensé pendant cette période sera donc significativement inférieur au plan de dépenses de la référence de base.

Pourtant, cela n’implique pas nécessairement un retard dans l’avancement du projet.

En effet, j’ai souvent vu une équipe sous staffée compenser tout ou partie des postes vacants par une meilleure coordination et une plus grande mobilisation de ses membres. Il convient donc de toujours mettre en perspective le travail réalisé avec les ressources utilisées.

A l’inverse, toute menace de retard dans les livrables ou dans l’atteinte de jalons clés du projet est signe de forte fièvre et à traiter en conséquence.

Comparez les coûts prévisionnels aux dépenses avérées

Image courtesy of cooldesign / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of cooldesign / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Tout dépassement significatif dans les dépenses recevra évidemment un bon niveau d’attention, mais il ne faut pas oublier de se préoccuper des situations de « sous dépense ».

Ce signal plus faible risque d’être négligé alors qu’il peut se révéler critique par la suite. Il peut en effet être indicateur de retards à venir : trop lente montée en charge, livraisons tardives de coûteux matériels et logiciels nécessaires au projet sur des tâches futures… Il peut aussi provenir de simples erreurs d’imputation des coûts qui nous rattraperons un jour prochain.

De plus, l’un des « jeux » favoris de nos collègues financiers (lors des replanifications budgétaires semestrielles ou trimestrielles) consiste à proposer comme estimation de coûts en fin de projet la somme des coûts déjà enregistrés dans le système comptable et du reste à faire. Il est donc impératif pour le chef de projet de bien maîtriser le montant des dépenses engagées par rapport au facturé.

Examinez la qualité des livrables

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

La qualité est selon moi plus importante dans la satisfaction client que la maîtrise des délais et des coûts même si celles-ci sont nécessaires. Sans produit de qualité, pas de satisfaction client. Donc, toute baisse de la qualité produite par rapport aux spécifications agréées est à analyser en détail pour en comprendre les causes racines et les éradiquer. Il ne sert pas à grand chose de livrer dans les temps et au coût prévu un produit qui ne satisfera pas le client quand bien même il répondrait aux demandes exprimées côté contenu. Le focus de toute l’équipe doit être avant tout la satisfaction client qui assurera la réussite dans le long terme et génèrera un flux de futurs projets intéressants. Hors, la satisfaction passe par la qualité des livrables et la qualité de la relation entre le client et l’équipe projet.

Suivez les problèmes ouverts (nombre, temps de résolution, âge)

Pas de projet sans problèmes, donc aucune raison de paniquer. Mais il convient, selon moi, de surveiller tout particulièrement la pile des problèmes ouverts non encore traités et son évolution dans le temps. Si cette pile continue de croitre, nous avons de réels soucis. D’autre part, l’âge des problèmes connus et leur temps de résolution sont des indicateurs clés.

If faut ne pas se limiter à regarder les moyennes (âge moyen, temps de réponse moyen…). Comme le disait l’un de mes directeurs, « Une personne ne sachant pas nager peut fort bien se noyer en traversant un fleuve qui a en moyenne 20 centimètres de profondeur ! »

Image courtesy of koratmember / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of koratmember / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Efforçons-nous de comprendre l’amplitude de variabilité de ces indicateurs en fonction de la criticité des problèmes (« show stopper », important, moyen, mineur) par rapport à des fourchettes acceptables définies pour le projet.

Par exemple, tout problème important devrait être adressé dans les 10 jours ou bien, nous ne laisserons pas plus de 10 problèmes de criticité moyenne en souffrance pendant plus de 3 semaines. Et mettons en place des alarmes lorsque de telles cibles sont dépassées.

Effectuez des revues régulières

Ne laissez pas  l’espace de temps entre deux revues de projet s’allonger jusqu’à devoir « sauter » une session prévue au calendrier. Si les points planifiés ne peuvent avoir lieu, c’est souvent indicateur d’un malaise sur le projet. Les causes de ce malaise peuvent être une surcharge ponctuelle ou répétée de travail, des retards qui s’accumulent, un désintérêt de certaines parties prenantes, une mauvaise communication, des agendas de réunion inintéressants, des sessions trop longues… Autant de raisons de s’en préoccuper et d’agir pour éliminer ces problèmes.

Gérez et maîtrisez les risques

"Image courtesy of pakorn / FreeDigitalPhotos.net"
« Image courtesy of pakorn / FreeDigitalPhotos.net »

Aucune excuse n’est recevable qui justifierait de ne pas revoir le registre des risques très régulièrement pour le mettre à jour, l’enrichir, et activer, le cas échéant, des plans de mitigation. Les conditions et l’environnement du projet changent sans cesse et les risques avec eux. De plus, les risques sont souvent liés entre eux et évoluent de concert. Attention à l’effet boule de neige si vous n’y prenez garde.

Par exemple, une augmentation de la probabilité d’occurrence de plusieurs risques faibles est indicative de danger de contagion. Alors, ne laissez jamais votre registre des risques prendre la poussière sur une étagère.

Managez le moral de l’équipe et aspects humains

Retards répétés du matin, départs anticipés, absentéisme ou au contraire dépassement systématique d’horaires raisonnables ou présentéisme sont quelques-uns des signes observables tant est que vous y prêtiez un peu d’attention. Ils s’accompagnent souvent d’un climat tendu, de querelles, de messages incendiaires, d’escalades nécessitant l’arbitrage du chef de projet, de mutisme, de haussements d’épaules… Autant de symptômes à prendre en compte afin d’éviter que la situation s’envenime.

Assurez-vous de la participation du sponsor et de l’implication et la satisfaction du client

Si vos sponsors vous semblent de moins en moins intéressés par votre projet: danger!

Les causes peuvent être relativement bénignes: d’autres projets en cours sont en crise, des urgences opérationnelles, un gros contrat en préparation. D’autres peuvent impacter fortement le projet: de nouveaux projets plus prioritaires, une réorganisation qui couve, un changement d’actionnaire, des directions inconsistantes ou changeantes du management… Mieux vaut passer un peu de temps à investiguer la situation.

Si ce sont les clients qui se montrent plus distants, moins impliqués ou insatisfaits: alerte rouge. Des actions immédiates sont probablement nécessaires pour solliciter leur avis, les écouter, les comprendre er proposer les changements nécessaires.

Anticipez par l’analyse des tendances des indicateurs

Les évolutions des indicateurs sont souvent (peut-être même toujours) plus importantes que les valeurs absolues.

Image courtesy of jscreationzs / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of jscreationzs / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Pourquoi tel ou tel indicateur est-il sur une pente dangereuse ? Pourquoi tel autre est-il erratique, imprévisible ou inconsistant ? Cela correspond assez bien à la surveillance des tendances d’évolution des signes vitaux des malades en hôpital, tels que la fièvre, la tension, les taux de globules rouges et blancs, les plaquettes…

Pour le projet, le nombre de demandes de changement, de problèmes reçus, de dépassements, d’absences… sont des chiffres à suivre graphiquement sur un graphe pour que les changements brutaux et tendances sur plusieurs périodes vous sautent aux yeux.

Voici donc quelques-uns des signes vitaux de nos projets que je voulais partager avec vous.

Surveillez votre projet et ses signes vitaux avec la plus grande attention, comme le ferai le médecin chinois avec ses patients. Vous vous devez comme lui de garder votre « patient » en bonne santé si vous voulez réussir (et accessoirement être payé) !

J’ai certainement manqué certains aspects qui vous paraissent importants, n’hésitez pas à nous les indiquer dans vos commentaires à ce billet et partagez vos propres expériences.